• The Dumbest Robber?

    After a laborious two-week criminal trial in a very high profile bank robbery case, the jury finally ended its 14 hours of deliberations and entered the courtroom to deliver its verdict to the judge.

    The judge turns to the jury foreman and asks, "Has the jury reached a verdict in this case?"

    "Yes we have, your honor," the foreman responded.

    "Would you please pass it to me," the judge declared, as he motioned for the bailiff to retrieve the verdict slip from the foreman and deliver it to him.

    After the judge reads the verdict himself, he delivers the verdict slip back to his bailiff to be returned to the foreman and instructs the foreman, "Please read your verdict to the court."

    "We find the defendant NOT GUILTY of all four counts of bank robbery," stated the foreman.

    The family and friends of the defendant jump for joy at the sound of the "not guilty" verdict and hug each other as they shout expressions of divine gratitude.

    The defendant's attorney turns to his client and asks, "So, what do you think about that?"

    The defendant looks around the courtroom slowly with a bewildered look on his face and then turns to his defense attorney and says, "I'm real confused here. Does this mean that I have to give all the money back????"
  • Smart Police Officer

    A motorcycle police officer stops a driver for shooting through a red light. The driver is a real jerk, steps out of his car and comes striding toward the officer, demanding to know why he is being harassed by the Gestapo!

    So the officer calmly tells him of the red light violation. The motorist instantly goes on a tirade, questioning the officer's ancestry, sexual orientation, etc., in rather explicit offensive terms.

    The tirade goes on without the officer saying anything. When the officer finishes writing the ticket he puts an "AH" in the lower right corner of the narrative portion of the ticket. He then hands it to The 'violator' for his signature. The guy signs the ticket angrily, and when presented with his copy points to the "AH" and demands to know what it stands for.

    The officer says, "That's so when we go to court, I'll remember that you're an asshole!"

    Two months later they're in court. The 'violator' has a bad driving record with a high number of points and is in danger of losing his license, so he hired a lawyer to represent him. On the stand the officer testifies to seeing the man run through the red light.

    Under cross examination the defense attorney asks; "Officer is this a reasonable facsimile of the ticket that you issued to my client?"

    Officer responds, "Yes, sir, that is the defendant's copy, his signature and mine, same number at the top."

    Lawyer, "Officer, is there any particular marking or notation on this ticket you don't normally make?"

    "Yes, sir, in the lower right corner of the narrative there is an "AH," underlined."

    "What does the "AH" stand for, officer?"

    "Aggressive and hostile, Sir."

    "Aggressive and hostile?"

    "Yes, Sir.

    "Officer, are you sure it doesn't stand for asshole?"

    "Well, sir, you know your client better than I do."

    How often can one get an attorney to convict his own client.
  • Classic Comeback

    If you ever testify in court, you might wish you could have been as sharp as this policeman. He was being cross-examined by a defense attorney during a felony trial. The lawyer was trying to undermine the policeman's credibility.

    Q: Officer, did you see my client fleeing the scene?

    A: No sir. But I subsequently observed a person matching the description of the offender, running several blocks away.

    Q: Officer, who provided this description?

    A: The officer who responded to the scene.

    Q: A fellow officer provided the description of this so-called offender. Do you trust your fellow officers?

    A: Yes, sir. With my life.

    Q: With your life? Let me ask you this then officer. Do you have a room where you change your clothes in preparation for your daily duties?

    A: Yes sir, we do!

    Q: And do you have a locker in the room?

    A: Yes, sir, I do.

    Q: And do you have a lock on your locker?

    A: Yes, sir.

    Q: Now, why is it, officer, if you trust your fellow officers with your life, you find it necessary to lock your locker in a room you share with these same officers?

    A: You see, sir, we share the building with the court complex, and sometimes lawyers have been known to walk through that room.

    The courtroom exploded with laughter, and a prompt recess was called.
  • The Truth Be Told

    A lawyer had a wife and 12 children and needed to move as his rental agreement was coming to an end for the home where he lived but was having difficulty in finding a new home.

    When he said he had 12 children, no one would rent a home to him because they knew that the children would destroy the home.

    He could not say that he had no children, he could not lie, after all, lawyers can not and do not lie. So, he had an idea : he sent his wife for a walk to the cemetery with 11 children. He took the remaining one with him to see homes with the Real Estate Agent.

    He liked one of the homes and the agent asked, "How many children do you have ?"

    He answered, "12 children."

    The agent asked, "Where are the others ?"

    The lawyer answered, with a sad look, "They are in the cemetery with their mother."

    And that's the way he was able to rent a home for his family without lying.

    MORAL: It is not necessary to lie, one only has to choose the right words. Lawyers don't lie... they are creative.